This is the quietest place I have been.

Modern lecture theatre. Video projectors, Behringer desks. Windows XP.

Quiet whir of JVC camera being operated by tech behind me.

Technicians working audio and video equipment.

Female voice, “…kunst nacht…”.

Two Genelec monitors.

Female voice, “…on here?”

Shuffling of conference program.

Male voice, “…you have to make sure, she’s here”. (Scottish accent).

A mini grand piano with the lid closed.

(Colour – dull green blue – desk top formica).

Duh-ding

Mac boots up.
Male voice, ‘Adam, tell people the show is starting in half an hour”. (Scottish accent).

Male voice, “You’re here on 3 and 4”.

playback > > Stereo bleep piece. Joyce is testing her PowerPoint presentation.

Male voice, “Video is feeding back”. (Scottish accent).

Beep

Laptop recognizes video projector.

Ba-ding

Generic volume cannot be removed from system just now.

Female voice,”The show is due to start…hi audience…”

Technicians joking amongst themselves.

Male voice, “We apologise for the delay due to technological and travel problems”. (Peter Stollery).

Stollery goes on to introduce the conference. The school of music here in Aberdeen is located within the School of Art and Education, which has funded this conference. The music department itself was only formed 4 months ago. The music school is in the process of creating an identity for itself; much of this self-definition is centred upon post-graduate activity in electro acoustic and sound art composition.

Rather tellingly, the SoundasArt conference is occurring alongside a festival of contemporary music (s.o.u.n.d.), this indicates the vector from which the organizers here are approaching sound art. An awkward meeting of entrenched academic composers, with the fluid open spaces of sound art.

Male voice, “Do you hear me in your headphones?” (Peter Troxler).

Troxler gives a short presentation providing us with some social context for the activities of urbannovember, the group that has organized the festival. The organization began in 2004 with an open uncurated public art event developed to counter plans by the British National Party (BNP) to march through Aberdeen’s city centre. Their next project in 2005 addressed the locally vital issue of the oil industry.

Male voice (from podium), “…sound and light is being bitted and streamed to everyone who could not afford to travel to Aberdeen, or were scared of the weather.”

One voice. Ending with health and safety.

Awkward switch over of wireless mic.

Bill Thompson greets everyone and provides some housekeeping information. He introduces one of the keynote speakers, Christina Kubisch, who is to speak next.

Awkward switch over of wireless mic.