Thompson: “You must speak louder.”
Hanson: “This is my conversational mode.”

Hanson begins with a well known anecdote from the Tate discussion list. A rather unfunny quote from Douglas Kahn.

I can’t understand him.
His accent (French?) is obscuring his words.

“My objective is not to define, but to engage dialog between sound art and sociology.”

He draws a rather spurious parallel between sound artists entering the realm of institutional visual art, with that of sociologists entering the art world.

“…restaging of studio space in public galleries…using the examples of Bruce Nauman and Matmos.”

He is hard to understand. He is rushing his words.

Garble. Garble. Garble.

“…structured network…”

The audience has their heads in their hands.

“The modern sound artist’s studio puts the composer in the same position as the painter in front of his canvas. i.e. working directly with sound.

The rhythm of his speech is irregular, fractured. Is he not confident? I don’t feel confident in what he is saying to me. He halts, backtracks, and allows himself smug asides. He taps along to a movie of Bruce Nauman’s ‘Mapping the Studio’ (1968). Is that part of the presentation? He pauses for water. His throat is dry. He IS nervous.

“Am I alright for time?”

Thompson : “10 minutes.”

“Cool.”

Thompson : “That’s a question.”

He rushes through Nauman and now we are with Matmos. Their piece ‘Work, Work, Work’, is used as an example of restaging the studio in a public space.

Mutter. Mutter. Mutter.

In this piece Matmos installed their studio in a gallery and interviewed the first visitor of the day, which they used as the basis of a composition, which they created in front of gallery visitors, with the aim of revealing their working process. Their motivation for this was because many electronic artists, in their words, and Hanson’s, think they are “splitting the fucking atom or something.”
“…in the artists’ studio, or the post-artists studio, if you will…”

“…the phenomena of sound art…”

“…unease at the sight of sound…”

“…so I’m going to listen to Matmos now…”

“…shut up…”

playback > > A piece of Matmos.

After the piece finishes, Hanson wants us to applause.
We hesitate.

Questions from the audience.

Someone asks about portability and mobility in this era of the laptop.

Hanson: “What do you want me to say about this?” (bluntly with disinterest)

Talk turns to Markus Popp (Oval) designing his own software.

Stollery makes an observation that new PhD electro-acoustic composers have not been showing interest in the facilities available in the studios of the institution here in Aberdeen. They are technologically self sufficient, and are much more likely to work from their own home or portable systems, only using the university for final mixes and mastering.

Duh-ding.

External hard drive has been found.