A lab hosted by Mariella Greil & Werner Moebius at Prisma Mexico 2009

Maybe manifesto
Maybe we move into the space between yes and no
Maybe we perform the spectacular spectator or performer
Maybe we overcome virtuosity and redefinition
Maybe we question the brute somatic nature of the body and make-believe transformations
Maybe we are all stars and invest in generosity
Maybe we share the in-between
Maybe we look for respect, hospitality and friendship
Maybe we become hybrid
Maybe we distort and recycle our style
Maybe we enjoy cunning concepts and teasing procedures and their strictures
Maybe we move beyond camp, eccentric, heroic and their opposites
Maybe we inverse the structure of the sublime
Maybe we decide for sensitive ambiguity
(response to Yvonne Rainer’s NO Manifesto and Mette Ingvartsen’s YES Manifesto)

Die Kunstpraxis als Werkform.

The lab creates space and framework for exploring emerging practices. “Who’s afraid of the in-between” contributes to a critical discourse on knowledge production in collaborative research and work modes both rehearsed and performed beyond closed categories.

writings from the in-between. emily sweeney, july 2009, mexico

the in-between is inherent. it is rich with experience, preserving a space where memory trails into possibility. it is not a state to be achieved, only recognized, and delicately. to focus on the in-between will cause it to shift. the instant we acknowledge a state as being in-between, we have arrived.

in order to find ourselves in-between, we engage with concrete structures. a vacuum is not in-between: it is nowhere.

where are the two poles that we would find ourselves between?
knowledge and ignorance
technique and pedestrianism
planning and sensation
consciousness and unconsciousness
self-consciousness and abandon
isolation and interaction
movement and sound
proprioception and desire
beginning and end

where would we find ourselves that we should feel in-between?
perhaps we will try to find sensitive ambiguity together.

once, in the laboratory, we exchanged rules. each of us wrote a rule on a small slip of paper and put it into a hat. then, we all selected rules that we were bound to follow for the duration of an open improvisation. i selected the rule to NEVER BEGIN!!! i could not predict how this would unfold. i could not conceive of never beginning.

i stationed myself against a white wall at one end of the space. there, i could feel the wind on my body from outside through an open door and i could see the shadows of trees shifting at the corners of my eyes. i had an easy view of the entire improvised event occurring in the space. NEVER BEGIN. i could not move but to breathe. my hair was moving in the wind; i could not move my head. my eyes searched round and round, roving the space; i could not move my head.

sounds, movements, sensations, interactions shifted before me. but i could not move. i stood still. i began (shit!) to feel an immeasurable pressure in my thighs and feet. my hands trembled; my legs trembled; my face contorted; i began to cry. i breathed; i focused; i stopped crying, and began crying again. i arrived in a space between proprioception and desire. i was present between every decision and every action; i filled the space with longing. the space filled with my longing. every actor’s action was infected with my desire.

is it possible to invite another person into my in-between? can i have company there?

is it possible to be alone in the in-between? do i depend upon the presence of company there?

where were we, that we should feel in-between there and someplace else?

where are we going?

does the in-between imply movement, instability, journeying? is it possible to arrive at the in-between?

are we comfortable in the in-between? is it possible to be comfortable in the in-between? do we want to be comfortable in the in-between?

“…if entire systems of representation, of meaning, had been extinguished inside him, entirely new systems had been brought into being.” Oliver Sacks, An Anthropologist on Mars

the in-between is a constant negotiation. the in-between is dependent upon binaries. the in-between denies binaries. the in-between rejects binaries.

i know only that i am in-between. i do not know why, or how. why do i strive for articulation? if i articulate this, will it disappear?

i am an artist who was raised in the united states. i find myself in mexico. all the time (walking, seeing, hearing, speaking) i have a heightened sense of myself living between my individual beliefs, hopes, and sensations, and those of the country i inevitably represent. can i shed this in-between? do i want to shed this in-between? why am i so uncomfortable in this space between myself and my perceived geopolitical identity?

i am a movement artist who was raised by a family of musicians. all the time (moving, listening, sounding) i have a heightened sense of myself living between my senses. do i want to focus on this in-between? will i damage my in-between by concentrating on it?

where is the space generated by this laboratory of in-between?

i am not afraid of the in-between. i fear its obliteration through description; articulation; location.

emily sweeney, july 2009, mexico

Underwater audio cinema. 4-channel site-responsive hörspiel commissioned by Newtoy Productions.

Live performance in Clissold Pool, Stoke Newington, February 2009.

Year:2008
Location: Germany
Worktype: Composition
Materials: Recorded Media (Stereo Audio)

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My sense of disconnection from the people of Bad Ems as a consequence of language and the reverberant nature of the Kunstlerhaus Schloss Balmoral architecture. I was working in a disembodied and digital process, where, despite my actual presence in Bad Ems, much of my time was spent online and isolated from the real-world context around me. Although this time was highly productive I decided to counter such work with a piece intended to connect me more closely with the people and environment around me.

I had made the acquaintance of Rainer Hoffman, administrator of the Kunstlerhaus, a few days earlier, we had managed an interesting conversation, and I had noticed that he had difficulties with his hearing, and spends the day with hearing aids (specifics of this?). I myself was experiencing a restricted access to auditory world around me, due to the building’s sonic characteristics, and my own poor understanding of German. I had for a long time wanted to try a version of Alvin Lucier’s ‘I Am Sitting in a Room’ (1970) and so proposed a collaborative work to Rainer.

‘I am Sitting in a Room’ is one of Lucier’s most well known works, and he has always encouraged interpretations of the piece. It is a work based in a short piece of spoken text, originally spoken by Lucier himself. The complete text of this original version is presented below:

I am sitting in a room different from the one you are in now. I am recording the sound of my speaking voice and I am going to play it back into the room again and again until the resonant frequencies of the room reinforce themselves so that any semblance of my speech, with perhaps the exception of r-r-r-rhythm, is destroyed. What you will hear, then, are the natural resonant frequencies of the room articulated by speech. I regard this activity nnnnnot so much as a demonstration of a physical fact, but more as a way to s-s-smooth out any irregularities my speech might have.

This short piece of text explains the work quite succinctly, and the final work was originally presented as a forty minute recording. I asked Rainer to translate the text into German, and whether he would be prepared to have his voice recorded for the purposes of the piece. He was initially hesitant, selfconscious about the way he speaks German, saying that people often comment that he speaks his mother tongue in a strange way as a result of his hearing disability. When however I explained Lucier’s own problems with speech, and that his own experience would add to the work, he readily agreed. Rainer’s translation of Lucier is as follows:

Ich sitze in einem Raum, der anders is als der Raum, in dem Sie sich gerade befinden. Ich nehme meine Sprechstimme auf und spiele sie ab, nehme sie auf und spiele sie ab, immer wieder – bis die Resonanzschwingungen des Raum sich selbst verstäken, so dass jede Ähnlichkeit mit dem Sprechen, auxer vielleicht mit dem Sprechrhythmus, ausgelöscht wird. Was Sie dann noch hören, sind die natürlichen Resonanzschwingungen des Raumes, gegliedert durch das Sprechen. Diese Handlung ist für mich weniger die Demonstration eines physikalischen Sachverhaltes, als vielmehr ein Weg, alle UnregelmäXigkeiten, die meine Sprache möglicherweise aufweist, zu glätten.”

The full iterative realisation of this work was carried out in the KHSB on the evening of 20th April 2008. The work is significantly different from Lucier’s, and the openness of his original intentions should be credited. My aims in attempting this work were met in the process of carrying out this work. I wanted a way to engage with the acoustic space of the KHSB, I needed some means of communication across a language barrier, I wanted to address my inability to speak or understand German and also to explore issues of authenticity with spoken German, interestingly fore grounded by Rainer’s inhibited access to the auditory. I would take this opportunity to thank Rainer for his participation in this work, and to hope that he enjoys listening to the transformation of his voice manifested by the acoustics of his daily place of work.






















Obstruction Placed: Position 1: (Distant from Art) (exterior)

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Obstruction Placed: Position 2: (Approaching the Kunstlerhaus) (exterior)

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Obstruction Placed: Position 3: (Inside the “Waterbugs” installation) (interior)

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Obstruction Placed: Position 4: (Kunstlerhaus Downstrairs Hallway: In-between the “Waterbugs”, “Skype Glitch.voices (remodelled)” and “Dissolving Ghost Piano” installations) (interior)

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Obstruction Placed: Position 5: (Kunstlerhaus Stairwell: Ground/First Floor: “Waterbugs” and “Dissolving Ghost Piano” installations audible) (interior)

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Obstruction Placed: Position 6: (Kunstlerhaus First Floor) (interior)

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Obstruction Placed: Position 7: (Kunstlerhaus Second Floor Stairwell – leading to open door to “Cat’s Cradle”) (liminal)

Obstruction Placed: Position 8: (Having Crossed the Border) (exterior)

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Obstruction Placed: Position 9: Overlooking (Higher Up in the Wooded Hillside Listening Down and Around (exterior)

Materials: white cotton thread, interior, exterior and liminal space, 7 kitchen knives, 7 electric guitar strings, white spray paint,

Of the works created during the residency, ‘Cat’s Cradle’ is perhaps the most complex piece, and the hardest to describe, both in terms of process and in its final form. There are several strands of thought running through this piece, and is the most conceptual and non-sound related work I have created to date. The initial concept for the piece was a direct result of my being detained at the hands of the British Transport Police when leaving King’s Cross Eurostar. I was thinking of a way of evoking an idea of a journey, and a means of expressing obstacles placed in the way of the traveller. This idea came from the concrete experience, but took on a different meaning as I explored the KHSB.

I had arrived a day early for the Art of Immersive Soundscapes Forum. 8 hours by Greyhound from Winnipeg airport across flat rolling endless prairie. The Empire Hotel. The cheapest place in town. Next door to the liquor store. The room was $25 a night. It hadn’t been changed in 25 years. Everything run down, and battered. A Friday night. Alone in the prairies. I locked myself into my room. I scanned the FM radio frequency to search for company.










Lecture Theatre, MacRobert Building. University of Abderdeen

This presentation concerns Streaming Media and Network Radio. Of particular interest to me is the selection of two of my case studies as examples, namely Negativeland and Sam Auinger (other artists selected by Byrne are Katherin Roggla, Bruce Russell and x.y)

playback > > Background level of unknown track

Byrne begins his tracing of the topic with the over-familiar citation of Marinetti’s Futurist Manifesto for Radio, La Radio from 1933. This vision is criticised for its rather utopian scope, and the discussion moves on to a consideration of broadcast as a medium and the essential tension between the visionaries of radio, such as Marinetti, and the political reality facing such artists when working in such a capital intensive domain. Early on in the radio’s history, studios and stations became rapidly centralised, moving away from the participatory, many-to-many networks imagined by Marinetti, to become fetishised centres for the dissemination of dominant discourse to societies being organised to maximise consumption and production. Artists who chose to work in this medium worked under highly restricted parameters, including such standardisations as program length, volume, subject taboos, the use of silence, restricted playlists.

E.g.s

Orson Wells – War of the Worlds.
Artaud – Pour en finir avec le jugement de dieu (1947)

Of relevance to my work, is the means by which the differences by which radio art and sound art can be distinguished. Key works in this area are Radical Radio by R.M. Schaefer (1987), and ‘Towards a Definition of Radio Art (19xx).

“Radio Art is not Sound Art, nor is it Music. It is Radio”.

“Sound Art and Music are not Radio Art just because they are broadcast on Radio”.

How can these efforts to delineate radio art practice be used to articulate similar efforts in sound art?

Keywords: Kunstradio, Austria, New American Radio.

n.b Both of these work within state infrastructure. What is the significance of this?

e.g. Negativeland – Over the Edge – KPFA, Berkeley, California.

Byrne goes on to consider how web streaming has suggested new strategies and possibilities for the medium of audio broadcast. There are questions; is internet streaming Radio Art? Is it a new form? It certainly is not radio. Let us consider the similarities and differences between the two.

This can be much expanded using Shaefer, and the Micro Radio Manifesto, Italy.

Traditional Radio
Web Broadcast
Single site
Multi-site streams
Regulated
Unregulated
Monologue
Dialogue / Trialogue
Diatope
Polytope
1 hour format
Long duration
Assimilated
Isolated
Owned
Shared
Promoting
Communing
Speakered
Screened
Through Air
Through Wires
Populist
Specialist

Questions – site of reception of both? Listening environments

Keywords

‘Radio Polyphony’ – The Thing, New York
RadioNetz, Berlin
Reboot.fm
WPS1
RadioDays
post.thing.net
Locus Sonus – audio art research group
Art Dirt Redux
Bitforms – podcast
Whitney Biennial mashup.

There is much of interest in this section, and it moves some way to explain the frustration and annoyance I felt at Hanson’s presentation. His view that the studio as object of discourse as relevant and of interest, reveals itself as an ill-informed and obsolete view of sound practice. Issues of portability, and the very examples of artists demystifying their workspaces that he presented, indicate an alternative position.

dematerialisation
influence of Fluxus, land art, Kubisch working in situ.
Sound art for mobile phones – who presented this – get paper  from Bill
Community initiatives

While the artist studio as a trope may well be in evidence in the works he presented, their relevance, and interest is limited in scope, and represents an historically entrenched position, showing little understanding of current practice.






Year: 2005-2006
Location : Morocco
Worktype : Laptop Improvisation Group
Materials: Tape Machine, PureData, Electric Guitar, MaxMSP, Ableton, FX, Field Recordings
Info : Laptop Performances, Tour of Morocco

Work Details
For the summer months of 2005 and 2006 I took part in a number of interdisciplinary art festivals in Morocco. These recordings, made in Marrakech, are examples of context-responsive electro-acoustic improvisations made by an ensemble of 4 players assembled for the project. A strategy based upon genetic algorithms, that is to say, a collaborative process of selection and modification of sounds was developed, prior to performance, in order to create cohesion and a group identity in, at times, quite difficult circumstances.

7000dhs (2006) Step 1 Export

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7000dhs (2006) Flute ou Chien

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7000dhs (2006) Le vegetable le moins cher

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7000dhs (2006) Ritual

7000dhs (2006) Le vrai gnaui blues

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7000dhs (2006) Taforalght 1

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7000dhs (2006) Taforalght 2

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7000dhs (2006) Marrakash

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7000dhs (2006) Tous les Portes sont fermees

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Genetic Algorithms: Rules of Evolution

1 each directory represents the gene pool for that 15 min section of performance. contribute as many specimens as you see fit (15 max?) =a lot of genetic material to become familiar with

naming conventions: ritual001-01.wav

means ritual sound file 001 – first generation

after a generation of evolution it would become
ritual001-02.wav

a further evolutionary step would result in
ritual001-03.wav

and so on
ritual001-04.wav
ritual001-05.wav
….

3 it would be interesting for each dna strand (sound file) to go thru a minimum of 4 steps

i.e to pass thru each of the ‘fitness selectors’ following the original entry into the gene pool.

adam
cate
ed
joel
milo

4 process
once you have downloaded the all the material, have a listen and assess the sample’s fitness for selection or rejection.

material selected is to be subjected to one of two processess

genetic splicing – dna from two selected samples is exchanged
mutation – dna is subjected to audio processing, and mutated into the next generation

nb/ neither of these processes should be applied to the entire strand, only sections of the strand may be processed, leaving some of the previous generation’s dna intact.

upload the next generation, with their new tag – e.g ritual001-01.wav, after modification, will be renamed, ritual001-02.wav

kill the parents (we should leave the originals online, but they are now unfit, and should be rejected)

by the end of this first stage of the process we should end up with a number of files:

ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav

these will serve as our genetic base for the improvisations in marrakesh

http://www.myspace.com/7000dirhams

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Year: 2005
Location: Arnos Grove, London.England
Worktype: Community and Schools Sound / Recyling Project
Materials: junk drum percussion, pot drums, shakers, flutes, voices, costume, sculptures, song, children, parent, staff and locals.

Work Details
Commissioned by Enfield Arts Unit, Enfield Council, North London. A week-long series of workshops in three different primary schools. Working with sculptors and costume designers, a procession performance was devised, based around a simple composed canon, able to be performed by children between the ages of 6 and 11. The event was structured around a tale from Mexican folklore, itself presented to the students as a soundpiece. This extract splices the narrative with the canon, as originally conceived, and the final realization by the school children as performed in a public park.

Proposal
Imagine 3 processions of costumed and masked primary pupils winding their way towards each other. Each procession contains representations one of the following elemental forces – SUN, WIND, or RAIN – each procession will be accompanied by pupils playing self-made instruments from recycled materials.

They converge in a park, within which pupils have created a sculpture trail along which the processions move. Their destination? A central meeting place, based around 3 larger dome sculptures also created by the students.

The three elemental processions gather around the central domes and create a celebratory and joyful storm of music, costume and sculpture.

The event ends in the early evening as dusk falls, with floating candle lanterns being floated along a little stream. As they disperse their beautiful light along the waterway, the pupils, parents, artists, teachers and community groups melt away into the night.

It is our intention to allow pupils, staff and parents from neighbouring schools to work together on an inclusive arts project which benefits the whole community of the Arnos Grove area. Using sound, light, costumes and masks, and instrument- making to transform a public space into a magical wonderland

The artists involved have a great deal of experience in facilitating workshops, working with young people and creating inclusive public events.

Schools Involved
Our Lady Of Lourdes Primary
Garfield Primary
Bowes Primary

Workshops – Skills taught / Topics covered

Following close collaboration on a number of projects, we can offer the following to the participating schools:

mask making
costume making
needlework
recycled instrument design
percussion workshop
sculpture – interacting with sound / light
wire making skills
environmental awareness
citizenship skills

Artists Involved / Project Roles

This group of artists have worked together on a wide range of projects – with schools and communities both in the U.K. and abroad. We are highly motivated, professional and responsible.

SUBORG

J Milo Taylor – Lead Artist / Instrument Making / Co-ordinator

Suborg’s role will be the instrument making and percussion workshops, and to provide co-ordination and administrative support to the project. Working with primary pupils, instruments will be constructed from recycled materials, teaching the pupils the art of creative thinking, positive problem solving and the fundamentals of rhythm.

LIGHT AND COLOUR WORKSHOP

Tammara Mattingly – Lead Artist / Sculpture / Co-ordinator
Zoë White – Sculpture / Workshop Facilitator

The Light and Colour Workshop has great experience in facilitating workshops and installations with schools and community groups throughout the North London area. They are driven to share their joy in their work and to inspire vulnerable and excluded members of the community with an Edmonton-based Arts/learning studio. Their work combines light and sculpture to create beautiful objects accessible to all.

Tammara’s role as lead artist will be one of co-ordination of festival and facilitating the sculpture workshops. Zoë White will be working in conjunction with Tamarra– the sculptural side of their work will be in two strands:

1) Parent/teacher workshop
Introduction to sculptural skills / individual pieces.
Participants will be learning new skills and how to work with new materials (e.g. coloured wires, theatrical gels, tin cans, plastic bottles). Each participant will create their own small sculpture that interacts with one of the central elements. These will become the objects that line the sculptural trail and lead the procession to the central meeting area.

2) Collaborative work on central domes. The focus point of the procession will be three domes based around the elemental themes:

Sun dome – using material such as coloured gels, coloured wire. Imagine a sundial – i.e. the dome as an object that will cast shadows, projects coloured light and movement of light – ever-changing as the earth moves around the sun.

Wind dome – using material with reflective surfaces the smallest breeze will cause this structure to shimmer in the wind. The reflective flickering light marking the movement of the winds circulating within our environment.

Rain dome – by using water and cascading containers water will flow along the outside of this sculpture. Places where the water may rest or be channelled to create a flowing sound that will be calming and magical.

Pupils’ work will be incorporated around a durable and robust aluminium preconstructed frame. (Dimensions 1.5m high, 3m diameter, and 1.5m radius). Each dome can be split into two halves, creating special spaces for pupils to gather for story-telling, future workshops etc.

These structures will be permanent and portable; after the event, the domes will be moved from the public park and one installed in the grounds of each participating school, thus improving each schools environment, and giving them a permanent record of their activities during the project.

OPALA GROUP

Opala Group was founded in 2000 in London by 5 Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design graduates.

Opala works in three distinct areas:

Theatre Performance Development . We create plays, and make theatre workshops for children and grown-ups. This summer we took part in a unique and fantastic week long festival in Morocco, in which Suborg also played a part. We ran mask and costume making workshops and a street procession for the children of the town.

The Bridging Cultures Initiative facilitates cultural exchange through projects of various artistic content (exhibitions, festivals, play readings etc).

The Film Room is dedicated to promoting young film-makers. Evan Manifattori is a very talented and original film-maker with many outstanding short films to his name. We propose to film the workshops and the actual event, and to provide the involved parties with a high quality document of the project.

COSTUME AND MASK MAKING WORKSHOPS

Ada Gadomski – Costume Design / Mask Making / Procession Leader
Barbara Fuchs – Costume Design / Mask Making / Procession Leader
Magdalena Canals Halewijn – Costume Design / Mask Making / Procession Leader

We have worked on a number of projects involving children throughout the years, both in the UK and abroad (Morocco, Spain, Yugoslavia, Austria). The workshops are designed to develop creativity and imagination through 3D expression of universal themes such as animals, seasons, fairy tale characters, elements etc.

We work with recycled materials that raise the awareness of environmental issues and help challenge the creativity in children by using known materials in unusual ways, e.g. cardboard boxes, plastic, packaging, wire etc.

Children will also learn about basic artistic techniques and materials through use of paint, brushes, glue, card, paper, scissors, staplers, painting on fabric, finger sawing, costume construction, etc.

At the end of a session each child will have created a mask and a costume of sun, wind or rain, to be worn during the procession. They will also carry flags and banners with the same elemental representations.

At the end of procession and the floating lantern ritual, children can keep their outfits and take them home, or the schools may decide to exhibit them on site.

Project documentation. Evan Manifattori – Film director. Camera.

We also propose to film one session from each school, and provide examples of work done during each of the workshops. The event will also be filmed and edited into a 15-25 minute documentary DVD of the event,

This work will be carried out to the highest standards and provide all the participating schools and community groups with an enduring record of their participation.






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Year: 2004
Location: Morocco
Worktype: Outdoor Radiophonic Installation
Materials: 10W Fm Radio Transmitter. 10 Stereo Fm Radios. Found Objects, Human Voice (Moroccan Arabic, French, Spanish)

Year:  2003
Location: Factory Berlin, Germany
Worktype:  Video / installation Documentation