The nonvulgar journey of sonic art

I listen, I hear, I obey.

Does the exquisitely dissonant institution of sound art, and its subsequent ordering of desire, ensure that we subscribe to a genealogy through which it is governed? In this composition I hear a rhizomic collective, which obeys, albeit contradictorily, a government of past and future time. Historical mapping reconceptualized, audibly so. I hear the pop, clunk, hum, clink, buzz of the sonic agent provocateurs scrambling to inscribe difference.

‘Tomtoumtomtoumtomtoum’; the ‘Cage’ of Sonic Arts past. I hear hindsight.

‘Bwwaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa’; the sound of sonic arts future.

I hear possibility, dynamic, open, multiple, textured, outside ‘time, (is there outside time?). Referring to Heidegger, Derrida describes how, in the nonvulgar or ‘Greek’ conception of time, times past, present, and future converge and diverge; they are at once glancing, touching and yet so very distant. The nonvulgar appear and disappear in this composition’s motifs, they ascribe difference, blend and further differentiate how I listen. I hear the sound of the oncoming community, Nietzsche’s Übermenschare, nonvulgar, allegorical.

This sonic journey has no pause, the repeating beating ‘new order’ of fleeting voices propels concepts adnauseam. Everything that can happen is happening, and not only once, but infinitely. Turning and returning. It does not go along with a simple, linear, modernist scenario. But further problematizes sonic arts institutionalized patterns of irrationality.

Further along the plane I hear double meanings, a double-pincer of the future: one linear, one nonlinear.

It invokes individuation, movement, body, and sensation. Voicing announcements of the future of noise; whilst scattering uncanny silence, more a buzz than a beep of the future becoming. Is this a compositional transformative strategy, or my listening as relational and ultimately performative? I hear the sonic future that never arrives because it was already always here. It sounds nonlinear, atemporal or polymorphically temporal. It presents post-human possibilities as resonant and reverberant.

Ironically, this playful and metaphorical collage of sound arts genealogy is not only broader, but more literally plausible than what Heidegger calls the received or “vulgar” view of orderly, progressive, linear time. Language itself, the splintering of sounds into signs, into embodied and disembodied representations, signals and signifiers, call into question my subjective image of the past: a schizophrenic plane of signification, a neurotic creativity, the disunity of the singularity of becoming sonic.

Finally, I hear silence, an absent sense of knowing, of the heard, that I project into a future: pop merging with click, and dissolution into ecstasy, which relieves my constitutive sense of loss. Lacan suggests that this loss is based on the illusion of the uncoordinated. As a listener at the end of this work I feel like a wobbly toddler looking in the mirror and happily hallucinating in my own disunity. Once again language splintering signification. I am left with the idea of an uncomfortable wholeness. The reconciliation of sonic arts past with its future seems like an empirical illusion.

Ennioa Neoptolomus http://radioplateaux.org/


78rpms, popular music, hungarian, greek, Caribbean, american, british, arabic, jewish, calypso, jazz, soundtrack, country, ballad, rembetika, blues, childrens’

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dusty, unclean, dirty, unmixed, unmastered, surface noise, decay, reactivation

original shellac discs
collected Jafo, Tel-Aviv, Israel. Autumn 2010

by sainsŵn and 612 D.J’s

for Mathilda

CHArt Twenty Third Annual Conference
Birkbeck, University of London, 43 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PD

Museums, galleries, archives, libraries and media organisations such as publishers and film and broadcast companies, have traditionally mediated and controlled access to cultural resources and knowledge. What is the future of such ‘top-down’ institutions in the age of ‘bottom-up’ access to knowledge and cultural artifacts through Web 2:0 technologies. Will such institutions respond to this threat to their cultural hegemony by resistance or adaptation? How can a museum or a gallery or, for that matter, a broadcasting company, appeal to an audience which has unprecedented access to cultural resources? How can institutions predicated on a cultural economy of scarcity compete in an emerging state of cultural abundance? The twenty-third CHArt conference will reflect upon these issues.

http://www.chart.ac.uk/chart2007/07programme.html

Essay Shortlisted for the 3D Visualisation in the Arts Network Student Award 2007

In ancient Greek, the name of Athens was [ha atna], related t? [h atn] and its dialectal variant[h at´n], the Attic and Ionic names respectively of the goddess Athena, the goddess of war and wisdom. The city’s name may have been in the plural, like those of (Thêbai) and (Mukênai), because it consisted of several parts. In the 19th century, was formally re-adopted as the city’s name. Since the official abandonment of Katharevousa Greek in the 1970s, however, the popular form (Athína) has become the city’s official name, though the plural may be kept for several purposes in literature.

fuk the polees

the destruction of athens

Pangrati, Ambelokipi, Exarcheia, Ano Patissia, Kato Patissia, Ilissia, Ano and Kato Petralona, Mets, Koukaki and Kypseli,

one of the longest of any city in Europe or the world; it has been 1981 885,737 – – continuously inhabited for at least 3,000 years
980s it became 1896 123,000[17] evident that smog from a conglomeration of historic gas factory distinct towns and villages that major waste management Greco-Roman, Neo-Classical, to modern efforts undertaken in the last decade gradually expanded and merged into people of all ages who will sing, dance and drink till dawn a single large metropolis; 1991 772,072 – 3,444,358[19] most of this expansion occurred during the second half of the 20th century factories Panathinaikos Football 1908 Super League Greece Apostolos Nikolaidis Stadium
Olympiacos Football 1925 Super League Greece Georgios Karaiskakis Stadium
AEK Football 1924 Super League Greece Athens Olympic Stadium
Panionios Football 1890 Super League Greece Nea Smyrni Stadium
Atromitos Football 1950 Super League Greece Peristeri Stadium
Egaleo FC Football 1930 B Ethniki Egaleo Stadium
Panathinaikos BC Basketball 1908 A1 Ethniki Athens Olympic Stadium
AEK Athens Basketball 1924 A1 Ethniki Galatsi Center
Panionios Basketball 1890 A1 Ethniki Helliniko Arena
Maroussi BCE Basketball 1970 A1 Ethniki Maroussi Arena
Spartakos Glyfadas Baseball 1990 National Baseball League Helliniko Baseball Center
Maroussi 2004 Baseball 1990 National Baseball League Helliniko Baseball Center
Athinaikos Handball 1927 National Handball League Helliniko Arena
Athens Rugby Rugby 1990 National Rugby League Athens Olympic Stadium
Starbucks Rugby Rugby 1983 National Rugby League Athens Olympic Stadium and an ever demotika diamerismata increasing fleet of automobiles, as well as a the Athenian 2001 745,514[20] climate is very dry the Attica 1971 867,023[18] – – region experienced a number of brush fires, including one that burned a 1921 (Post-Population exchange) 718,000[17] significant portion parking facilities, cocktail drinks and umbrellas of a large forested national park in Mount Parnitha – considered Omonia Square (Greek:critical to maintaining better air in Athens all year round. Damage to the 1833 4,000[17] – –
1870 44,500[17] – –
– –
1921 (Pre-Population exchange) 473,000[17] – –
– –

1991 772,072 – 3,444,358[19]
3,130,841[20] 3,761,810[park has led to worries over a stalling in the tap rebetadika water is rebetadika safe, and of very good quality. improvement of air rebetadika quality rebetadika in the city.compared with most of Syntagma mediterranean Europe lack of Syntagma adequate free Syntagma Snowfalls rebetadika occur everydue to overcongestion, had evolved into the PsirriPsirriPsirriPsirri city’s most important challenges.
anti-pollution measures Attiki Odos ring road a much more functional city. bound Syntagma by Mount Aegaleo in the west, Mount Parnitha in the north, Mount Penteli in the northeast, Mount Hymettus in the east, and the Saronic Gulf in the southwest he carved details on the five Plaka, Monastiraki, and Thission caryatids of the Erechtheum have seriously degenerated, Ekali, Nea Erythrea, Agios Stefanos, Drosia, Kryoneri, Attica, Kifissia, Maroussi, Pefki, Vrilissia, Melissia, Pendeli, Halandri, Psychiko and Filothei while the face of the horseman on the Parthenon’s west side is all but obliterated.






Tula Centre for Contemporary Art, Russia April 2007
Moscow Book Arts Fair June 2007

This is where we began in some ways. . .

Running a mobile record store, we started putting on experimental gigs at the Lord Cecil. Number one punk hangout in Hackney. Our Sunday headfuck soon alienated the place’s regular drinkers. They wanted London Pride, we gave them soundmusic. New, difficult, unique.

The Flatliners
Meon
Z Black Poodle
The Rebel
and the extraordinary Amassed Bontempi Drone Orchestra

A weekly 2 hour show of experimental sound.

Year: 2001-2004
Location: Edmonton, North London, England
Worktype:  Radio Show
Materials:  Vinyl, tape, CD, minidisc, mixer, effects, voice
Info: Fuzz Fm Community Internet Radio Station (Managed by Harry Holmes)