Lecture Theatre, MacRobert Building. University of Abderdeen

This presentation concerns Streaming Media and Network Radio. Of particular interest to me is the selection of two of my case studies as examples, namely Negativeland and Sam Auinger (other artists selected by Byrne are Katherin Roggla, Bruce Russell and x.y)

playback > > Background level of unknown track

Byrne begins his tracing of the topic with the over-familiar citation of Marinetti’s Futurist Manifesto for Radio, La Radio from 1933. This vision is criticised for its rather utopian scope, and the discussion moves on to a consideration of broadcast as a medium and the essential tension between the visionaries of radio, such as Marinetti, and the political reality facing such artists when working in such a capital intensive domain. Early on in the radio’s history, studios and stations became rapidly centralised, moving away from the participatory, many-to-many networks imagined by Marinetti, to become fetishised centres for the dissemination of dominant discourse to societies being organised to maximise consumption and production. Artists who chose to work in this medium worked under highly restricted parameters, including such standardisations as program length, volume, subject taboos, the use of silence, restricted playlists.

E.g.s

Orson Wells – War of the Worlds.
Artaud – Pour en finir avec le jugement de dieu (1947)

Of relevance to my work, is the means by which the differences by which radio art and sound art can be distinguished. Key works in this area are Radical Radio by R.M. Schaefer (1987), and ‘Towards a Definition of Radio Art (19xx).

“Radio Art is not Sound Art, nor is it Music. It is Radio”.

“Sound Art and Music are not Radio Art just because they are broadcast on Radio”.

How can these efforts to delineate radio art practice be used to articulate similar efforts in sound art?

Keywords: Kunstradio, Austria, New American Radio.

n.b Both of these work within state infrastructure. What is the significance of this?

e.g. Negativeland – Over the Edge – KPFA, Berkeley, California.

Byrne goes on to consider how web streaming has suggested new strategies and possibilities for the medium of audio broadcast. There are questions; is internet streaming Radio Art? Is it a new form? It certainly is not radio. Let us consider the similarities and differences between the two.

This can be much expanded using Shaefer, and the Micro Radio Manifesto, Italy.

Traditional Radio
Web Broadcast
Single site
Multi-site streams
Regulated
Unregulated
Monologue
Dialogue / Trialogue
Diatope
Polytope
1 hour format
Long duration
Assimilated
Isolated
Owned
Shared
Promoting
Communing
Speakered
Screened
Through Air
Through Wires
Populist
Specialist

Questions – site of reception of both? Listening environments

Keywords

‘Radio Polyphony’ – The Thing, New York
RadioNetz, Berlin
Reboot.fm
WPS1
RadioDays
post.thing.net
Locus Sonus – audio art research group
Art Dirt Redux
Bitforms – podcast
Whitney Biennial mashup.

There is much of interest in this section, and it moves some way to explain the frustration and annoyance I felt at Hanson’s presentation. His view that the studio as object of discourse as relevant and of interest, reveals itself as an ill-informed and obsolete view of sound practice. Issues of portability, and the very examples of artists demystifying their workspaces that he presented, indicate an alternative position.

dematerialisation
influence of Fluxus, land art, Kubisch working in situ.
Sound art for mobile phones – who presented this – get paper  from Bill
Community initiatives

While the artist studio as a trope may well be in evidence in the works he presented, their relevance, and interest is limited in scope, and represents an historically entrenched position, showing little understanding of current practice.

Subtle rising intensity as aircraft sounds from exterior penetrates the pedestrian walkway.

Vacuous greeting of female flight hostess.

playback > > Piped female voice, nasal and American, “Welcome to BMI aircraft”.

I don’t like this environment.

Musak, almost imperceptible (sounds like Billy Joel), cuts out suddenly as baggage lockers are systematically snapped shut by female hostesses.

Constant SWooShhhhh of air conditioning.

A designed environment.

No passenger is speaking. Chit chat from staff in rear of aircraft.

A sneeze from the seat behind me.

ding-dong

playback > > The captain addresses us from the flight deck.

“We have a small restriction on our departure time”.
Calm, reassuring.

playback > >         Male voice, “Cabin crew prepare for departure”.

Cut into the captain’s address.

ding-dong

playback > > AOR musak continues.

Female voice over intercom, ”Your mobile phones must be switched off.”

Female voice over intercom, ”No transmission devices.”

Female voice over intercom, ”Your attention is appreciated.”

Female voice over intercom, ”Sit back, relax, and enjoy your journey.”

Female voice, “We’ll do the demo”.

snaps, tinkle from staff activity in back of plane.

Giggle from two seats behind me.

Footsteps are muffled, but felt though the fuselage.

playback > >    Male voice over intercom, “Please take note of the brace position”.

Good fidelity, calm, Midlands tinge to the accent.

“If oxygen is required, breathe normally”.

The flight staff are bored going through this ritual performance.

playback > >    Female voice “May we wish you a pleasant flight”.

Truly inane.

At least I have a window seat.

Swwwsssh The continued exhalation of the air conditioning.

Slow rising glissando of engines. Levels off at low level.

Groans and creaks of various unknown parts of the machine.

English accents. People mostly silent reading in-flight literature.

Cabinets are being closed by attendants in the rear of the aircraft.

Subtle increase in air pressure. Slow breath of air flow into cabin.

ding-dong

Aircraft begins to taxi along tarmac.

Low rumble of tyres across joins in the tarmac. Felt rather than heard.

Mid-pitch whir above and behind my head.

Quiet grinding of some wheeled mechanism in starboard wing.

Further rumble from the tyres on larger joins, and imperfections in the tarmac. The aircraft vibrates with each bump.

The sun is neat the horizon, golden and wintered. Flashes of the multitude of stationary aircraft.

Whiiir / swoosh / grhmmmm

Aircraft comes to a halt.

The taxiing aircraft look like hungry sharks. Predatory. Awaiting their chance to defy gravity.

Indistinct female chat from hostesses strapped into the rear.

Sudden increase in volume of engines. Duration 7 seconds. It plateaus out. Was that this plane, or another one taking off outside?

All is calm. Florescent and sterile.

Magazine pages being flicked and thumbed. The company’s marketing is going in and through rows 1-25.

At least I have a window seat.

A slight increase in grumblings from the engines. Plane moves forward. Smoother surface here.

A 747 takes off ahead of us. The power of its engines (a volcano) can be felt.

I see the grass moving in the wind outside, but hear no natural sounds other than the nose sniff from the seat behind me, and the fat man next to me breathing too heavily from his nostrils.

sniff, sniff, from behind.

fnh..Fnh..fnah The fat man breathes. A strange comforting touch of animal life.

Female voice, “But I don’t know. They changed it”. Hostess from rear.
ding

ding

Crumple of sweet papers. Perhaps crisps or a sandwich.
dzzzzzzzzzwwwhhhhhooooooossssssssss

A moment of disorientation as the wheels leave the ground.

SSSSS From rear right once airborne.

I am thinking of all the unknown systems, processes and procedures surrounding me.

ding-dong

playback > >        Female voice,”Drinks are available”.

“We take cash, euro and pounds and MasterCard”.

I consider this process, making marks on a page to document my soundscape. Is it effective? Can you hear it? Internal audition, a connection to your memory of this non-space. Will I hear any original sound during this trip?

I am travelling to Aberdeen to participate in a sound art conference. I am moving out of my familiar home environment. I live in Hackney, London. The sounds I hear daily include;

Police and ambulance sirens. Pretty constant. Pretty loud.

Passing buses. Very low frequency. Something felt rather than heard.

The neighbours. A young family from Poland with 2 young boys. Laughing, screaming, stamping, tantrums. We live on a council estate, very low quality housing from the 1960s. I hear the light switches when they are turned on and off, so thin are the walls. They are a young couple, and obviously enjoy each other’s bodies. Soon after his return home; Boing, boing, boing, squeak squeak, squeak.

The boiler turning on and off. Newly installed by British gas. Why does it always fail when the cold weather comes? An engineer should have come to fix it today.

dong

Housemate #1. A sound designer. All kinds of artificial sounds emit from his room downstairs. Looped, distorted, transposed. Repeated endlessly as he works on pieces for film, theatre and dance.

Male voice,“Thankyou”. (English accent)

Chink of money being taken.

ding-dong

Housemate #2. A 42 year old with a slight drinking problem. I hear a cycle of sounds from her room. A new drunken lover. Sex sounds.

ding-dong

Furious. For a few weeks. Then furious arguments. Then crying. Then her laptop showing DVDs as she comforts her broken heart with expensive red wine.

Female voice, “Did I miss you? Did you want something?” (New Zealand Accent).
slurrrpp
Female voice, “Three pounds ninety.” (New Zealand Accent).

Building works. The whole estate is undergoing compulsory improvements. Poundings, large plant, angle-grinders, cement mixers, carpenters, electricians, plasterers, shouted instructions, arguments. People are working.

Occasionally church bells.

I have no control of these sounds, and limited means of insulating myself against them. Is it not better to be aware of my environment, than cocooning my ears from the intrusions? I do not have a choice.

I can’t sleep in a room with a ticking clock.

In the summer, the estate kids play in a patch of green behind the flat. Their families come from all over the world. They seem happy.

The aeroplane is making an endless gasp, Shhahhhsshh, as if it is amazed by its ability to fly. Should it give up this vocalization, we should surely fall to the ground.

This exercise is intended to illuminate some questions I have regarding the evocation, documentation and reporting of sonic environments. What opens up between this silent? page and the immersive digital environment that is being created during this research? Writing this, I hear an inner voice articulating this process. Simultaneously, I am aware of the external sounds of the flight.

Indistinct chatter from passengers further up the plane to the port side.

As well as easily recalling familiar sounds from my home, I am also projecting into the future, anticipating my experience of sound in the next few days. In this way, this active attitude towards listening simultaneously places me in the past, visiting keynote sounds of home, in the present, aware of my immediate sonic environment, but also involved in a process of inner dialogue with regards to what I am writing, and finally in an imagined sonic future awaiting me in Aberdeen. None of these seem particularly distinct, but rather point marking out a fluid space that flows between notions of self, location, context and past/present/future.

shaahhsshh.

An active listening channel has been opened that sits alongside normal psycho-biological activity in my body. I feel connected to what /where /when /how – was, what /where /when /how – is and what /where /when /how – will be.

Internal dialogue disrupted by female-voiced flight announcement that we are coming in to land. The message is much harsher in timbre, tone and volume than previous messages.

Shaaashhh / Griing. Something is changing with regards to threshold.

Ding-dong anyone?

Extraction fans – low level cyclical whirrr.

playback > > Musak – AOR style audio backdrop centred upon coffee bar.

Coffee machine and clatter of cups, saucers, glassware. People are working here. Polish girls and Asian boys.
dOk / tink / Kling
Most people are silent.

Mother with small child,
“He’ll not be a moment…”

Male voice, “Freaks me out that…(Yorkshire accent)

Mother, “…certainly do…“,

Male voice, “Watching telly…and call Ian. This was the last time. I was in bed. Fucking hell. Then the next day…”

Fruit machines are silent from here, but their lights are flashing.

Distinctive click of a metal Zippo lighter from behind me.

Unidentified electronic pulse. 2 second duration.
Continued whirrr of extractors and coffee bar in background.

General atmosphere is quiet, calm, pensive, synthetic. Colour – light grey.

Mobile phone incoming message tone from woman at table 2 meters away.

Male voice, “It’s not worth it”. The Yorkies continue their chat.

Subsonics from engines outside the large rectangular windows penetrate the interior. Felt rather than heard.

Female flight announcer on public address system. A flight to Glasgow.

“…All other passengers remain seated. BMI wishes you a pleasant journey”.

Reasonable audio fidelity and diffusion. Clear, good frequency response.

Moog sound in musak track suggests possible merging with electronic tones of mobile phone tones.

From behind, new female voice, “…basically, she’s still waiting.”

Male voice, “She’s paranoid.”

Same female voice, “…you can still plough on. I hope it all works out.”

Same male voice, “It’ll never change.”

I am asked for a light.

Outside of the smokers’ area, a silenced TV gives news of Iraq violence, Lebanon Funerals and the Russian spy is dying.

playback > > Female flight announcer. Flight to Manchester.

“Business class passengers can board at their leisure”.

Her voice, too close to the mic pops and distorts on the ‘B’, ‘c’, ‘p’, and ‘b’. Pop shield required.

playback > > “Since you been gone…”

Swooshhhhhh swell of air conditioning.

(breath, sigh, and coffee machine).

sploosh,

pockle

playback > > Female flight announcer,”Thankyou for waiting.”

Through the large windows an aeroplane pulls in. No sound can be heard. Strangely dislocating.

Passengers have boarded the flights to Glasgow and Manchester. Ambient sound levels have fallen. The TV is now audible. I can hear the weather report from the widescreen display (BBC 24).

The blandly carpeted floor silences footsteps. I decide to leave the smokers’ area, and go towards the waiting area by the departure gate.

The Blurred Compilation Album: Through Coffee Machines, Applause and Near Silence to Just Sound.

A Sonic Journey from Hackney to Aberdeen. 23-26 November 2006

Blurring of the Boundaries Conference. Music Department. University of Aberdeen

A series of writings on sound.

To be read in indeterminate order.

SIDE A

track 1)
| 23.11.06.| 15.00hrs | Smokers’ area. Heathrow Airport. Terminal 1 Departures. Gate 8

track 2)
| 15.30hrs | On aircraft. Flight BD676

track 3)
| 15.45hrs | Reception Area / Café, MacRobert Building. Uni. of Aberdeen

track 4)
| 18.00hrs | Lecture Theatre, MacRobert Building. Uni. of Aberdeen

track 5)
| 18.45hrs | Christina Kubisch “A Personal History of Sound Art 1976-2006″

track 6)
| 20.00hrs | Jerome Hansen, “Mapping the Studio (Fat Chance Matmos): Sonic and visual arts connected through the artist’s workspace.”

track 7)
| 20.30hrs | Joyce Shintani ‘Working the In-Between.’ A ‘Feminine Reading’ of Maryanne Amacher’s Sound Art

track 8 )
| 21.00hrs | David Prior |Soundwalking as a Research Tool:
Some thoughts on the use of Soundwalking in the Warwick Bar development project

SIDE B

track 9)
| 25.11.06 10.00hrs | Lecture Theatre, MacRobert Building. University of Aberdeen | Chris Byrne “Streaming Media and Networked Radio”

track 10)
| 10.45hrs | Keynote Address | Rajesh Mehta “Sounding Buildings: New Music and New Architecture”

track 11)
| 16.15hrs | Concert Hall | Nouritza Mattosian and Rohan de Saram “The World of Xenakis”

track 12)
| 20.00hrs | Concert Hall | Keith Rowe, Rajesh Mehta, and Rohan de Saram Improvised Performance

track 13)
| 21.00hrs | Bill Thompson and Patrick Keenan – Improvised Performance

track 14)
| 26.11.06 | 09.45hrs | Lecture Theatre, MacRoberts Building, Uni.of Aberdeen | Owen Green “More Than ‘Just a Hammer': Critical Techniques in Electroacoustic Practice”

track 15)
| 10.00hrs | Dugal McKinnon, Spectral Memories. The Aesthetics of the Record

track 16)
| 10.45hrs | Jana Phillips, “Sonic Postcards: A consideration of the interdisciplinary and artistic possibilities of a school-based sound education project” & Adam Proctor “See Hear Inverurie”

track 17)
| 11.30hrs | Keynote Address |Jonty Harrison “Dilemmas, Dichotomies and Definitions: acousmatic music and its precarious situation in the arts”

track 18)
| 13.30hrs | Concert Hall. Acousmatic Concert Over a multi-channel loudspeaker diffusion system

1. Pete Stollery | ‘scenes /rendez-vous’
2. James Wyness | “Metallurgy”
3. Jonty Harrison – Unsound Objects

track 19)
| 15.30hrs  | Plenary Session

(bonus hidden track)
| 21.43hrs | Belmont Cinema bar, Aberdeen






Year: 2005-2006
Location : Morocco
Worktype : Laptop Improvisation Group
Materials: Tape Machine, PureData, Electric Guitar, MaxMSP, Ableton, FX, Field Recordings
Info : Laptop Performances, Tour of Morocco

Work Details
For the summer months of 2005 and 2006 I took part in a number of interdisciplinary art festivals in Morocco. These recordings, made in Marrakech, are examples of context-responsive electro-acoustic improvisations made by an ensemble of 4 players assembled for the project. A strategy based upon genetic algorithms, that is to say, a collaborative process of selection and modification of sounds was developed, prior to performance, in order to create cohesion and a group identity in, at times, quite difficult circumstances.

7000dhs (2006) Step 1 Export

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7000dhs (2006) Flute ou Chien

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7000dhs (2006) Le vegetable le moins cher

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7000dhs (2006) Ritual

7000dhs (2006) Le vrai gnaui blues

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7000dhs (2006) Taforalght 1

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7000dhs (2006) Taforalght 2

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7000dhs (2006) Marrakash

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7000dhs (2006) Tous les Portes sont fermees

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Genetic Algorithms: Rules of Evolution

1 each directory represents the gene pool for that 15 min section of performance. contribute as many specimens as you see fit (15 max?) =a lot of genetic material to become familiar with

naming conventions: ritual001-01.wav

means ritual sound file 001 – first generation

after a generation of evolution it would become
ritual001-02.wav

a further evolutionary step would result in
ritual001-03.wav

and so on
ritual001-04.wav
ritual001-05.wav
….

3 it would be interesting for each dna strand (sound file) to go thru a minimum of 4 steps

i.e to pass thru each of the ‘fitness selectors’ following the original entry into the gene pool.

adam
cate
ed
joel
milo

4 process
once you have downloaded the all the material, have a listen and assess the sample’s fitness for selection or rejection.

material selected is to be subjected to one of two processess

genetic splicing – dna from two selected samples is exchanged
mutation – dna is subjected to audio processing, and mutated into the next generation

nb/ neither of these processes should be applied to the entire strand, only sections of the strand may be processed, leaving some of the previous generation’s dna intact.

upload the next generation, with their new tag – e.g ritual001-01.wav, after modification, will be renamed, ritual001-02.wav

kill the parents (we should leave the originals online, but they are now unfit, and should be rejected)

by the end of this first stage of the process we should end up with a number of files:

ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav
ritualxxx-05.wav

these will serve as our genetic base for the improvisations in marrakesh

http://www.myspace.com/7000dirhams

Year : 2006
Location : England
Worktype : Contemporary Improvising Trio
Info : with Adam Asnan, Ed Kelly

Data Membrane

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German Bight

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Polaris Redux

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Locations: Node.london Festival, E:vent Gallery. Shoreditch, Ev*a Fringe Festival, Limerick
Worktype: Circuit-bent puppetry performance
Info: with theatre designer/puppeteer Barbara Fuchs and artist/circuit bender Spax (Joel Cahen).

Demo project developed with Richard Scrase and presented at the Royal Geographical Society

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Year: 2005
Location: Arnos Grove, London.England
Worktype: Community and Schools Sound / Recyling Project
Materials: junk drum percussion, pot drums, shakers, flutes, voices, costume, sculptures, song, children, parent, staff and locals.

Work Details
Commissioned by Enfield Arts Unit, Enfield Council, North London. A week-long series of workshops in three different primary schools. Working with sculptors and costume designers, a procession performance was devised, based around a simple composed canon, able to be performed by children between the ages of 6 and 11. The event was structured around a tale from Mexican folklore, itself presented to the students as a soundpiece. This extract splices the narrative with the canon, as originally conceived, and the final realization by the school children as performed in a public park.

Proposal
Imagine 3 processions of costumed and masked primary pupils winding their way towards each other. Each procession contains representations one of the following elemental forces – SUN, WIND, or RAIN – each procession will be accompanied by pupils playing self-made instruments from recycled materials.

They converge in a park, within which pupils have created a sculpture trail along which the processions move. Their destination? A central meeting place, based around 3 larger dome sculptures also created by the students.

The three elemental processions gather around the central domes and create a celebratory and joyful storm of music, costume and sculpture.

The event ends in the early evening as dusk falls, with floating candle lanterns being floated along a little stream. As they disperse their beautiful light along the waterway, the pupils, parents, artists, teachers and community groups melt away into the night.

It is our intention to allow pupils, staff and parents from neighbouring schools to work together on an inclusive arts project which benefits the whole community of the Arnos Grove area. Using sound, light, costumes and masks, and instrument- making to transform a public space into a magical wonderland

The artists involved have a great deal of experience in facilitating workshops, working with young people and creating inclusive public events.

Schools Involved
Our Lady Of Lourdes Primary
Garfield Primary
Bowes Primary

Workshops – Skills taught / Topics covered

Following close collaboration on a number of projects, we can offer the following to the participating schools:

mask making
costume making
needlework
recycled instrument design
percussion workshop
sculpture – interacting with sound / light
wire making skills
environmental awareness
citizenship skills

Artists Involved / Project Roles

This group of artists have worked together on a wide range of projects – with schools and communities both in the U.K. and abroad. We are highly motivated, professional and responsible.

SUBORG

J Milo Taylor – Lead Artist / Instrument Making / Co-ordinator

Suborg’s role will be the instrument making and percussion workshops, and to provide co-ordination and administrative support to the project. Working with primary pupils, instruments will be constructed from recycled materials, teaching the pupils the art of creative thinking, positive problem solving and the fundamentals of rhythm.

LIGHT AND COLOUR WORKSHOP

Tammara Mattingly – Lead Artist / Sculpture / Co-ordinator
Zoë White – Sculpture / Workshop Facilitator

The Light and Colour Workshop has great experience in facilitating workshops and installations with schools and community groups throughout the North London area. They are driven to share their joy in their work and to inspire vulnerable and excluded members of the community with an Edmonton-based Arts/learning studio. Their work combines light and sculpture to create beautiful objects accessible to all.

Tammara’s role as lead artist will be one of co-ordination of festival and facilitating the sculpture workshops. Zoë White will be working in conjunction with Tamarra– the sculptural side of their work will be in two strands:

1) Parent/teacher workshop
Introduction to sculptural skills / individual pieces.
Participants will be learning new skills and how to work with new materials (e.g. coloured wires, theatrical gels, tin cans, plastic bottles). Each participant will create their own small sculpture that interacts with one of the central elements. These will become the objects that line the sculptural trail and lead the procession to the central meeting area.

2) Collaborative work on central domes. The focus point of the procession will be three domes based around the elemental themes:

Sun dome – using material such as coloured gels, coloured wire. Imagine a sundial – i.e. the dome as an object that will cast shadows, projects coloured light and movement of light – ever-changing as the earth moves around the sun.

Wind dome – using material with reflective surfaces the smallest breeze will cause this structure to shimmer in the wind. The reflective flickering light marking the movement of the winds circulating within our environment.

Rain dome – by using water and cascading containers water will flow along the outside of this sculpture. Places where the water may rest or be channelled to create a flowing sound that will be calming and magical.

Pupils’ work will be incorporated around a durable and robust aluminium preconstructed frame. (Dimensions 1.5m high, 3m diameter, and 1.5m radius). Each dome can be split into two halves, creating special spaces for pupils to gather for story-telling, future workshops etc.

These structures will be permanent and portable; after the event, the domes will be moved from the public park and one installed in the grounds of each participating school, thus improving each schools environment, and giving them a permanent record of their activities during the project.

OPALA GROUP

Opala Group was founded in 2000 in London by 5 Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design graduates.

Opala works in three distinct areas:

Theatre Performance Development . We create plays, and make theatre workshops for children and grown-ups. This summer we took part in a unique and fantastic week long festival in Morocco, in which Suborg also played a part. We ran mask and costume making workshops and a street procession for the children of the town.

The Bridging Cultures Initiative facilitates cultural exchange through projects of various artistic content (exhibitions, festivals, play readings etc).

The Film Room is dedicated to promoting young film-makers. Evan Manifattori is a very talented and original film-maker with many outstanding short films to his name. We propose to film the workshops and the actual event, and to provide the involved parties with a high quality document of the project.

COSTUME AND MASK MAKING WORKSHOPS

Ada Gadomski – Costume Design / Mask Making / Procession Leader
Barbara Fuchs – Costume Design / Mask Making / Procession Leader
Magdalena Canals Halewijn – Costume Design / Mask Making / Procession Leader

We have worked on a number of projects involving children throughout the years, both in the UK and abroad (Morocco, Spain, Yugoslavia, Austria). The workshops are designed to develop creativity and imagination through 3D expression of universal themes such as animals, seasons, fairy tale characters, elements etc.

We work with recycled materials that raise the awareness of environmental issues and help challenge the creativity in children by using known materials in unusual ways, e.g. cardboard boxes, plastic, packaging, wire etc.

Children will also learn about basic artistic techniques and materials through use of paint, brushes, glue, card, paper, scissors, staplers, painting on fabric, finger sawing, costume construction, etc.

At the end of a session each child will have created a mask and a costume of sun, wind or rain, to be worn during the procession. They will also carry flags and banners with the same elemental representations.

At the end of procession and the floating lantern ritual, children can keep their outfits and take them home, or the schools may decide to exhibit them on site.

Project documentation. Evan Manifattori – Film director. Camera.

We also propose to film one session from each school, and provide examples of work done during each of the workshops. The event will also be filmed and edited into a 15-25 minute documentary DVD of the event,

This work will be carried out to the highest standards and provide all the participating schools and community groups with an enduring record of their participation.






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Year: 2004
Location: Morocco
Worktype: Outdoor Radiophonic Installation
Materials: 10W Fm Radio Transmitter. 10 Stereo Fm Radios. Found Objects, Human Voice (Moroccan Arabic, French, Spanish)