J. Milo Taylor, George Brock-Nannestad, Dirk Specht
Kunsthochschule für Medien Köln

This paper approaches noise from a media anarcheological paradigm closely informed by Siegfried Zielinski’s notion of “deep media time”. The observation that noise is not absolute, but is variable is somewhat banal; yet if the temporal, methodological and aesthetic scope is extended beyond the conventional discourses around noise what implications for practice may be drawn?

The origins of the paper derive from a research fellowship undertaken at the Kunsthochschule für Medien Köln which dealt with sound, noise and listening as practice-based research methodologies. A selection of discarded shellac records (cultural noise) forms the material basis of this study. This media detritus contains program material created during a problematic yet arbitrary period of Cologne’s past (1929-62 – this period defined simply by the contingent array of shellacs found). These discs also offer today’s listeners traces and scars of the damage and decay these traumatised objects have experienced in their lifetime.
These material artefacts are noiseful in many regards: a conventional approach to archiving or preserving these might involve media migration into the digital domain after which processes of “noise-cleaning” may be undertaken. Such cleaning may aim to remove “noise” from “signal”. Yet how is such difference established? There are plentiful examples of problematic media cleansing – and a central issue explored in this paper is this distinction between what the authors frame as “primary” and “secondary” information.

Hence, issues around the context and techniques used during the original recording (e.g. frequency transfer functions), the means by which this recording is produced as a capitalist object (e.g. post-emphasis curves), and the subsequent unintended inscriptions upon the media surface in the course of the objects’ biography (e.g. careless handling) provide a deep media perspective upon the noisy media object.
























following Takahiko Iimura, Observer/Observed/Observer, chapter Camera 1/2 – Monitor 1/2

Exhibition at Quare Gallery, London.
Curated by: Marialaura Ghidini






Tula Centre for Contemporary Art, Russia April 2007
Moscow Book Arts Fair June 2007


Year: 2003
Location: Germany
Worktype: Sound Installation / Performance
Materials: Mobile Webcam, space, location, found objects and people
Info: Factory Berlin

Between 2002-2004 I made a series of visits to an artist-run space in the old industrial area of Schöneweide, East Berlin where I presented a number of sound installations and performances. This short film documents some of the activity from that time.

Tief und weit / dunkel / kuehl / klar / heel und unbegrenzt / ist der indusrielle raum.

One of the largest areas of now abandoned industrial production and around Berlin can be found in Berlin-Schoneweide. It forms part of the European industrial cultural heritage. Beautiful monuments create the atmosphere of this part of Berlin. They bear witness to the former industries and determine to this day the lives of those who live there. Most of the warehouses and factories gleaming in yellow brick are situated alongside The River Spree. A road runs through their middle. The workers’ living quarters were erected on one side of this road, the sites for production in the other. When AEG/TRO and KWO closed down in 1996, about 25,000 men and women lost their jobs.”

Deep and wide / dark / cool / clear / bright and endless / is the industrial space.

Factory- Berlin

This local area and its current state
Vacant industrial sites
Position and articulate
Within the chosen concept
Recognised / realised / ignored / overcome / resolved
Diversity of the location
Immmerse
Paths of exploration
The enviroment that helped shape those works
He’s doing artificial things

Year:  2003
Location: Factory Berlin, Germany
Worktype:  Video / installation Documentation