The nonvulgar journey of sonic art

I listen, I hear, I obey.

Does the exquisitely dissonant institution of sound art, and its subsequent ordering of desire, ensure that we subscribe to a genealogy through which it is governed? In this composition I hear a rhizomic collective, which obeys, albeit contradictorily, a government of past and future time. Historical mapping reconceptualized, audibly so. I hear the pop, clunk, hum, clink, buzz of the sonic agent provocateurs scrambling to inscribe difference.

‘Tomtoumtomtoumtomtoum’; the ‘Cage’ of Sonic Arts past. I hear hindsight.

‘Bwwaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa’; the sound of sonic arts future.

I hear possibility, dynamic, open, multiple, textured, outside ‘time, (is there outside time?). Referring to Heidegger, Derrida describes how, in the nonvulgar or ‘Greek’ conception of time, times past, present, and future converge and diverge; they are at once glancing, touching and yet so very distant. The nonvulgar appear and disappear in this composition’s motifs, they ascribe difference, blend and further differentiate how I listen. I hear the sound of the oncoming community, Nietzsche’s Übermenschare, nonvulgar, allegorical.

This sonic journey has no pause, the repeating beating ‘new order’ of fleeting voices propels concepts adnauseam. Everything that can happen is happening, and not only once, but infinitely. Turning and returning. It does not go along with a simple, linear, modernist scenario. But further problematizes sonic arts institutionalized patterns of irrationality.

Further along the plane I hear double meanings, a double-pincer of the future: one linear, one nonlinear.

It invokes individuation, movement, body, and sensation. Voicing announcements of the future of noise; whilst scattering uncanny silence, more a buzz than a beep of the future becoming. Is this a compositional transformative strategy, or my listening as relational and ultimately performative? I hear the sonic future that never arrives because it was already always here. It sounds nonlinear, atemporal or polymorphically temporal. It presents post-human possibilities as resonant and reverberant.

Ironically, this playful and metaphorical collage of sound arts genealogy is not only broader, but more literally plausible than what Heidegger calls the received or “vulgar” view of orderly, progressive, linear time. Language itself, the splintering of sounds into signs, into embodied and disembodied representations, signals and signifiers, call into question my subjective image of the past: a schizophrenic plane of signification, a neurotic creativity, the disunity of the singularity of becoming sonic.

Finally, I hear silence, an absent sense of knowing, of the heard, that I project into a future: pop merging with click, and dissolution into ecstasy, which relieves my constitutive sense of loss. Lacan suggests that this loss is based on the illusion of the uncoordinated. As a listener at the end of this work I feel like a wobbly toddler looking in the mirror and happily hallucinating in my own disunity. Once again language splintering signification. I am left with the idea of an uncomfortable wholeness. The reconciliation of sonic arts past with its future seems like an empirical illusion.

Ennioa Neoptolomus http://radioplateaux.org/

Motion in Place Platform: Project Website

The Motion in Place Platform brings together a cross-disciplinary group to develop new technologies allowing researchers to move out of the studio,to map and measure the human experience and response when moving through places.

The MiPP team uses motion capture (mocap) systems to record different forms of movement data on site. A first system developed in collaboration with Brighton-based motion-capture company Animazoo, adapted their IGS-190m, currently the most advanced inertial motion capture system on the market, for use outside a studio. Using gyroscopic sensors attached to flexible suits, this system allows the collection of high-resolution, full-body data from two people in a fixed area over limited time periods, recording, for example, the movements needed to collect water from a well.


following Takahiko Iimura, Observer/Observed/Observer, chapter Camera 1/2 – Monitor 1/2

Exhibition at Quare Gallery, London.
Curated by: Marialaura Ghidini



Year: 2010
Location: Quare Gallery, London
Worktype: Sound Installation
Materials: found speakers, 5.1 amplifier, squalor, dirt, voices, granulation, resonance, darkness.

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Live performance commission based around the concept of ‘source-code’ which became an econo sound installation exploring some of the theoretical writing about sound proposed by Salomé Voegelin in her Listening to Noise and Silence: toward a Philosophy of Sound Arts, Continuum Press, NY, ISBN: 9781441162076

Exhibition documentation including video piece “Observer-Observing (Ears, Eyes, Ears & Mouth)” (2010) following Takahiko Iimura, Observer/Observed/Observer, chapter Camera 1/2 – Monitor 1/2

Quare Gallery, London
http://www.or-bits.com/

Torture Garden

http://www.scrapclub.co.uk/

Member of Adachi’s Group at “Speaking Out” Symposium. Tate Modern, South Bank, London

This symposium focused on the use of the spoken word in artistic practice and its manifestations in sonic and audiovisual art works. Taking the lead from the recently published anthology of works Playing with Words: The Spoken Word in Artistic Practice, this event encompasses performances, talks and conversations by artists and researchers who employ spoken words as their material and inspiration.

Contributors included Adachi, Caroline Bergvall, Dani Gal, Brandon LaBelle, Cathy Lane, Oswaldo Macià, Nye Parry, Inua ‘Phaze’ Ellams, Imogen Stidworthy, David Toop and Trevor Wishart.

Organised by CRiSAP

http://www.adachitomomi.com/

http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/eventseducation/symposia/20795.htm

Sound, light and movement performance with Mariella Greil and Werner Moebius.

Audrey Chen (cello/voice/electronics)
Werner Moebius (electronics)
J Milo Taylor (electronics/electric baritone guitar)

Audrey Chen is a Chinese-American musician and performance artist born outside of Chicago in 1976. Using the cello, voice and analog electronics, Chen’s work focuses on the combination and layering of traditional and extended techniques. A large component of her music is improvised and her approach to this is often extremely personal and visceral. Her performance work incorporates sound, movement and visual/sculptural concepts. Chen performs solo and in collaboration with a wide number of musicians and dancers. Among musicians, she has worked with many great artists, including Phil Minton, Tetuzi Akiyama, Toshimaru Nakamura, Ko Ishikawa, Elliott Sharp, Aki Onda, Phill Niblock, Frederic Blondy, Jim Pugliese, Alessandro Bosetti, Mike Cooper, Mats Gustafsson, Mazen Kerbaj, Michael Zerang, Tatsuya Nakatani, Le Quan Ninh, Joe Mcphee, Susan Alcorn, Michele Doneda, Paolo Angeli, and Gianni Gebbia. Some current projects include: duos with Phil Minton, Frederic Blondy, Robert van Heumen, Katt Hernandez, Nate Wooley, a new trio project with Nate Wooley and C. Spencer Yeh, 3AandE: with Seamus Cater, Robert van Heumen and Nate Wooley and Trockeneis: with Andy Hayleck, Dan Breen, Catherine Pancake and Paul Neidhardt. Chen has performed in Europe, Russia, Australia, New Zealand, China, Japan, Taiwan and the USA. She is currently based in Baltimore, MD USA where she is member of the Red room and High Zero Collective, an on-going series and international festival devoted to experimental improvised music.

www.myspace.com/audreychen

Werner Moebius works with sounds, beats and files in the context of audio culture, sonic and intermedia art in between conceptualisms,contemporary music, electroacoustic improvisation and electronica. He uses the plasticity of sound to set up dialogues with other media and music methodologies. From abstract sound material he creates a unique mix of styles ranging from minimalistic soundscapes to weird instrumental poppy tunes. Generating sounds is taken as a basis to develop complex compositions as well as audiovisual and transitive concepts in collaborations with artists of differing media.

Works, performances and collaborations with many artists including Fennesz, Christoph Kurzmann, Gelatin, F.M.Einheit, David Moss, Jason Khan, N.U.Unruh, Hans Joachim Roedelius, Billy Roisz, Cornelie Müller, Alexeij Sagerer, Hanno Leichtmann, Johannes Strobl, Stephan Mathieu, Rudi Mahall, Didi Bruckmayer, Alexander de Goederen, Oliver Hangl, Ulli Koscher, Heidrun Holzfeind, Paul Divjak, Georg Wagenhuber, Christoph Hinterhuber, Machfeld, Gernot W. Koza, Frenk Lebel, Hans Falb, Stefan Parnreiter, Renèe Stieger, Phillip Quehenberger, Marco Eneidi, Hermann Stangassinger, Hannes Schweiger, Wilbert de Joode, DD Kern, Lee Patterson, Gene Coleman, Todd Carter , Mariella Greil.

www.wernermoebius.net